Louisiana Charters Are by Far the Worst According to 2011 8th-grade NAEP Anaysis

People take John White and LDOE at their word that RSD is doing outstanding. Independent analysis continues to show otherwise. RSD is not a separate agency from LDOE, it is a part of it.

We would never consider taking a teacher’s word, alone, as proof they were the best teacher in the state. We don’t let principals evaluate their schools for us and tell us how great they are or if they are struggling. We don’t let any other districts in the state evaluate themselves except RSD, which is always self-evaluated as outstanding and revolutionary, every year. Yet even with all these “vast improvements” it still ranks at the bottom of our state by just about any positive metric you can find. And that, my friends, is before we even touch on all the scams they pull like exiting 10% more of their 9th grade cohorts out of the country than the sister, parish run district, colocated in New Orleans. That means that their grade rates, which are worst in the state, are a minimum of 10% lower than they’ve claimed. If a 50% graduation rate is what you are looking for, then RSD might be for you. It will cost you though. In the first years after the storm per pupil amounts were more than 4 times the average per pupil amount in the state.

deutsch29

One of the primary problems with Louisiana’s state-run, all-charter Recovery School District (RSD) is that the same state that is in control of data (and the official word on its data) is also committed to representing its state-run district in the best light.

For this reason, independent analysis of data on Louisiana’s schools is particularly valuable, especially when the researchers are able to procure data independently of the Louisiana Department of Education (LDOE).

Such is the case of an analysis of student-level eighth-grade 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) data by two researchers from the University of Arizona, Francesca Lopez and Amy Olson. The Lopez-Olson analysis is featured in this Network for Public Education (NPE) policy brief. Specifically, Lopez and Olson compared traditional public schools to see what notable differences there might be between charters and traditional schools on eighth-grade 2011 NAEP outcomes.

Lopez and Olson’s analysis of charters…

View original post 1,128 more words

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